Iceland reprimanded by 35 countries over whaling

Iceland reprimanded by 35 countries over whaling

A formal diplomatic protest, known as a démarche, was today delivered to the Icelandic Government in Reykjavik. The top-level protest registered countries’ “strong opposition” to Iceland’s continued whaling, particularly of endangered fin whales. The démarche also objects to Iceland’s international trade in whale products, stating: “Fin whales and minke whales are listed under the Convention…
Will the vaquitas go extinct this month?

Will the vaquitas go extinct this month?

A new report about the situation of the world’s smallest porpoise raises concerns over the survival of the species. With fewer than 25 breeding females estimated to be left and the totoaba fishing season about to get underway this month could determine the future of the species. The report, produced with the help of the…
British turtles are booming

British turtles are booming

It may take more than a day trip to the coast to see the booming turtle population but the numbers of green turtles on British dependency Ascension Island are booming. The latest survey shows that turtle numbers on the main beaches now total 24,000 nests – an increase of 500% since records began in the…
Iceland kills first fin whale of the season

Iceland kills first fin whale of the season

Conservation groups are calling on the International Whaling Commission (IWC) and its member governments to condemn Iceland’s commercial whale hunt following confirmation that the Icelandic whaling company Hvalur hf has killed yet another endangered fin whale. The whale was killed off Iceland’s west coast and landed today at the company’s processing station in Hvalfjörður, less…
International plan launched to save the sawfish

International plan launched to save the sawfish

Scientists from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) have launched a global strategy to save the most threatened group of fish in the world – the sawfish. While sharks and rays are regularly featured in popular conservation campaign the sawfish are often the forgotten relations of the big fish. The new plan is…
Gannets spot easy pickings from 11km away

Gannets spot easy pickings from 11km away

The impact of trawlers and their waste on seabird populations appear to be much larger than previously thought. A study by the University of Exeter highlights that the ‘footprint’ of a trawler is as large as 11km radius. This footprint influences the foraging behaviour of seabirds as they now associate trawlers with easy-pickings. Using GPS…